Nightmare Saves 200 Lives

Sometimes an imaginary nightmare can stop a terrible, real-life one from happening. Such was the case in this clipping from 1933.

Children's nightmare saves 200

Children’s Nightmare saves 200 Sun, Dec 24, 1933 – Page 3 · The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) · Newspapers.com

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How Newspapers Captured D-Day on the Home Front

On June 6, 1944, newspaper front pages throughout the United States were filled with one thing: D-Day. Huge headlines, countless articles, and striking images all told the story of the critical invasion taking place in France.

But alongside the gripping news from overseas, newspapers also documented another side to D-Day, one closer to home: They captured how the people of their communities reacted to news of the invasion.

Below, we’ve gathered a sampling of 12 of these home front reactions from around the United States, as well as Canada, England, and Australia. Click on any image, article excerpt, or headline below to view the full thing on our site.

  • Windsor Daily Star, 06.06.1944
    Windsor Daily Star, 06.06.1944

Explore more D-Day newspaper coverage on our Topic Page! Or search Newspapers.com for other D-Day content.

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101 Years Young

In this story found across multiple papers in the early 1920s, 101 year old Janet Newbury shares the vanities, life experiences, and pastry perks that come with age.

Oldest Nurse, 101, Waiting To Become

Oldest Nurse, 101, Waiting To Become “More Mature” Tue, Oct 30, 1923 – Page 9 · Green Bay Press-Gazette (Green Bay, Wisconsin) · Newspapers.com

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Ethel Marks Arrested for “Masquerading in Male Attire”

Sometimes you just want to wear some trousers and have some fun. Alas, that didn’t work out too well for a woman named Ethel Marks in 1912:

Mrs. Ethel Marks arrested for

Mrs. Ethel Marks arrested for “masquerading in male attire” Mon, Dec 23, 1912 – Page 15 · The San Francisco Call (San Francisco, California) · Newspapers.com

One thing is for sure: she was from Missouri.

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Disney’s Aladdin: History & Trivia

Today marks the release of Disney’s newest take on Aladdin, an event that never would have happened without the success of its popular animated predecessor. In honor of the beloved original cartoon, here are five fun facts to mildly entertain your friends and family on the drive (or magic carpet ride) to the theater.

Disney's Aladdin

Disney’s Aladdin Wed, Nov 25, 1992 – 14 · The Daily Herald (Provo, Utah) · Newspapers.com

1. Aladdin’s character changed significantly during the writing process

Between the initial pitch and the film’s release, almost everything about Aladdin’s character completely changed. His age, his family situation, and even the choice of inspiration for his personality and looks shifted over the course of several years’ work.

Revisions included aging Aladdin up, writing his mother out of the film

Revisions included aging Aladdin up, writing his mother out of the film Wed, Nov 25, 1992 – 26 · The Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Indiana) · Newspapers.com

Al’s lack of charisma and “on-screen” presence was a recurring problem in early versions. Between the self-assured Jasmine and the scene-stealing Genie, Aladdin had a hard time keeping up. Forunately, he went through several rewrites to make his character a stronger contender.

Early Aladdin drawings meant to resemble Michael J. Fox

Early Aladdin drawings meant to resemble Michael J. Fox Sun, Oct 10, 1993 – 35 · The Herald-News (Passaic, New Jersey) · Newspapers.com

Aladdin and Jasmine

Aladdin and Jasmine Fri, Nov 27, 1992 – 53 · The Ottawa Citizen (Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) · Newspapers.com

2. Much of the story was based on the 1940 film, The Thief of Baghdad

The Arabian Nights story of Aladdin is a well-known source of inspiration for the movie we know and love today. But a fantasy film from the 40s about a scrappy young thief, a handsome king, and a (nameless) beautiful princess was also significant to the story. It even includes a deceitful adviser, Jaffar.

Aladdin heavily inspired by

Aladdin heavily inspired by “The Thief of Baghdad” Fri, Nov 27, 1992 – Page 78 · Northwest Herald (Woodstock, Illinois) · Newspapers.com

3. Artistic influences varied, from ancient art to modern caricature

It’s pretty fascinating to see what goes into a movie that, on the surface, can seem like little more than a children’s cartoon.

Inspiration for Agrabah

Inspiration for Agrabah Wed, Nov 25, 1992 – 14 · The Daily Herald (Provo, Utah) · Newspapers.com

Aladdin art influences

Aladdin art influences Sun, Nov 22, 1992 – 54 · Leader-Telegram (Eau Claire, Wisconsin) · Newspapers.com

And here’s a bit of fun trivia about the film’s use of color:

Use of color in Disney's Aladdin

Use of color in Disney’s Aladdin Wed, Nov 25, 1992 – 14 · The Daily Herald (Provo, Utah) · Newspapers.com

Aladdin and his magic lamp

Aladdin and his magic lamp Wed, Nov 25, 1992 – 26 · The Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Indiana) · Newspapers.com

4. Robin Williams’ star power secured success (against his wishes)

The biggest controversy of the film’s history has to do with its most recognizable talent, Robin Williams. The role of Genie was not just perfect for Williams’ incredible versatility—it was specifically written for him.

Robin Williams Steals the Show (Aladdin)

Robin Williams Steals the Show Sun, Dec 6, 1992 – 20 · The Times Recorder (Zanesville, Ohio) · Newspapers.com

Robin Williams is the no-so-secret weapon of

Robin Williams is the no-so-secret weapon of “Aladdin” Fri, Nov 27, 1992 – 53 · The Ottawa Citizen (Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) · Newspapers.com

Williams was happy to take the part; he wanted to be involved in animation and help create something great for his children. Disney agreed to his one request: that they not to use his voice to sell merchandise or prominently feature his character for marketing. You can probably guess (or remember) how that went.

Robin Williams has public falling out with Disney

Robin Williams has public falling out with Disney Sun, Apr 14, 1996 – 21 · Santa Maria Times (Santa Maria, California) · Newspapers.com

All’s well that ends well. After a direct-to-video sequel (The Return of Jafar, 1994) and a change in Disney management, a public apology was made to Williams. The original Genie was back for Aladdin and the King of Thieves, and some Genie-led educational videos to boot.

5. Aladdin broke the record for animation

Shortly after its release, Aladdin surpassed Beauty and the Beast as the highest-grossing animated film. However, it would only hold that record for about two years before being smashed by 1994’s wildly successful The Lion King.

Aladdin becomes highest grossing animated film of all time

Aladdin becomes highest grossing animated film of all time Wed, Jan 27, 1993 – 25 · The Post-Star (Glens Falls, New York) · Newspapers.com

1992 New York Times Review of Aladdin calls it a

1992 New York Times Review of Aladdin calls it a “dizzying, elastic miracle” Sun, Nov 15, 1992 – 120 · The Odessa American (Odessa, Texas) · Newspapers.com

Do you have any fond memories of Aladdin, and are you planning to see the new adaptation? Tell us about it below! Try a search on Newspapers.com to find more on the movie, its influences, and its reception.

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Puffy the HypnoCat

Need a nap? Try taking a look into the “huge, unblinking eyes” of Puffy, King of all cats, for a bit of restful hypnotism.

Puffy Can Make People Cat Nap

Puffy Can Make People Cat Nap Mon, Apr 9, 1945 – 9 · Press and Sun-Bulletin (Binghamton, New York) · Newspapers.com

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Unusual Wedding Ceremonies

Wedding ceremonies bring with them a wide range of experiences. Mundane or magical, weird or wonderful, there’s a lot of pressure to make that knot-tying day something to remember. In the case of the clippings below, the happy couples made memories novel enough to earn a spot in the newspaper.

Married by Telegraph

Married by Telegraph Thu, Jun 8, 1876 – 1 · Wisconsin State Journal (Madison, Wisconsin) · Newspapers.com

Married at 124 Years

Married at 124 Years Fri, Nov 6, 1891 – Page 1 · Harrisburg Daily Independent (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) · Newspapers.com

Married in a Trolley Car

Married in a Trolley Car Fri, Jan 25, 1907 – Page 3 · Altoona Tribune (Altoona, Pennsylvania) · Newspapers.com

Wedding Ceremonies That Are Not Cut and Dried

Wedding Ceremonies That Are Not Cut and Dried Sun, Jan 30, 1910 – Page 16 · The Spokane Press (Spokane, Washington) · Newspapers.com

Marriage on Skis

Marriage on Skis Fri, May 27, 1910 – 5 · The Weekly Guard (Council Grove, Kansas) · Newspapers.com

Married by Telephone

Married by Telephone Wed, Nov 1, 1911 – 6 · The Lindsborg Record (Lindsborg, Kansas) · Newspapers.com

Wedding on Wheels

Wedding on Wheels Mon, Apr 10, 1950 – Page 3 · Asbury Park Press (Asbury Park, New Jersey) · Newspapers.com

This is just a few of the many clippings to find on this topic. Try a search on Newspapers.com for more.

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19 Incredible Photos from 1919 You’ve Never Seen Before

Historical newspapers are full of amazing photographs. Unfortunately, many old newspaper photos have been long forgotten—not given a second thought since the day they were first published decades (or centuries!) ago. But thanks to the digitization of historical newspapers on sites like Newspapers.com, these photos are no longer lost to time!

To highlight a few of these remarkable historical photos, we decided to look back 100 years—to 1919. So we combed century-old newspapers on our site to find 19 incredible historical images from 1919 that you’ve probably never seen before. Some are tied to major news events—like the Boston Molasses Disaster or the first transatlantic flight—but others simply document the lives of everyday people in the year that followed World War I.

Of course, behind every photograph is a story. To learn more about any of the photos below, click on the image to view the original caption or article on our site.

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“He Met 20 Ghosts”

Here’s an interesting article from 1922. A man named William H. Bryson claimed to have been visited by many ghosts from his past, and all but one were “first rate chaps.”

He Met 20 Ghosts

He Met 20 Ghosts Sun, Mar 12, 1922 – 8 · New York Herald (New York, New York) · Newspapers.com

Bryson claims ghosts don't have clammy hands or exhale carbon dioxide

Bryson claims ghosts don’t have clammy hands or exhale carbon dioxide Sun, Mar 12, 1922 – 8 · New York Herald (New York, New York) · Newspapers.com

Those last couple lines are in reference to a haunted farm in Caledonia Mills, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, a story that was making its own trail in the papers of early 1922.

The Ghostly Fellows

Most of the ghosts Bryson met were friendly, and were often people he’d known in life.

Some of Bryson's Ghosts

Some of Bryson’s Ghosts Sun, Mar 12, 1922 – 8 · New York Herald (New York, New York) · Newspapers.com

But according to Bryson, the ghosts did not appreciate being given the cold shoulder (though it seems nothing malevolent came of their frustration.) Only one ghost was ever unwelcome, an old business partner who haunted Bryson for six straight nights to scold him for losing his money.

Despite all these visitations, Bryson seemed pretty comfortable with the whole experience.

Bryson not nervous about ghostly visitors

Bryson not nervous about ghostly visitors Sun, Mar 12, 1922 – 8 · New York Herald (New York, New York) · Newspapers.com

See the full article here, or try a search for similar stories on Newspapers.com.

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