Best Strategies: Clippings

Cover photo

Newspaper clippings are significant in both historical and sentimental ways. If you’ve ever discovered clipped gems in a library file, posted on a bulletin board, folded into a letter, stuck between the pages of a book, or pasted into an album, then you know of their appeal. A clipping directs us to a snippet of valuable news or focuses our attention to a seemingly casual item that must have been important to the person who clipped it in the first place.

On Newspapers.com, clippings are elevated to a digital level. Unlike those in dusty scrapbooks or creased inside yellowing envelopes, the clippings on Newspapers.com maintain their quality, are more discoverable, and easier to share with others. We can clip to our heart’s content without worrying about losing a scrap of paper or watching important words smudge and fade over time.

The Clippings link is readily accessible at the top of every page. Click on it to view your clippings as well as those of others. Browse through recently clipped items for an intriguing glimpse at what others find interesting in the online newspapers. Of course, creating your own clippings is a lot of fun, too.

Anytime you come across an article you’d like to save or share, reach for your virtual scissors by choosing “Clip” at the top of the viewer window. Drag the edges of the box that appears around the item of interest, add a description if you wish, and your clipping will be saved in “Your Clippings” for you to find again. You can share your clip through a variety of options to the right under “Share this clip.” Choose to send the link to another, embed it in a webpage, or share it with your friends and family on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.

Newsprint clippings of the past often show up without a paper’s name or publication date. With Newspapers.com that’s no longer a problem as each clipping is saved with the publication’s title and date permanently attached. If you choose to print a clipping, that important information is printed as well.

A clipping can be an article, search, page, newspaper, or another member’s profile. It’s a great way to save things you like, share interesting stories you find, and stay up to date on things that interest you.

Clippings are so ubiquitous, it’s easy to find references to “newspaper clippings” spanning decades and regions by searching on Newspapers.com. Here are some links to clippings about, well … clippings! This Staff Reporter feels a bit like her mother, sending these clippings to you, our readers. But, we’ve all been on the sending or receiving end at some point in our lives, right? Enjoy!

9 thoughts on “Best Strategies: Clippings

  1. just wondering about how to see the pictures? I have not see any pictures thus far!

  2. I have an offer to subscribe to your site. I already subscribe to Genealogybank. I went to your site twice to see what newspapers you have. Both time is stall my computer and I still do not know what newspapers you have available. Mostly I am interested in Philadelphia but I am also interested in others.
    I can afford to subscribe to everything.

  3. For people who look for old newspapers fultonhistory.com is a great resource, for NYS newspapers going way back to 1800s. Over 23,580,000 Old New York State Historical Newspaper Pages. It’s free…

  4. I have a subscription to Ancestry.com and would like to know if this is part of my subscription I pay for or do I have to pay more for this?

    • Newspapers.com is separate from Ancestry.com though Ancestry does offer some bundled options that include Newspapers.com. The folks in Ancestry’s customer support team can help you find the right subscription.

  5. Pingback: Tip: Using “Share” | Fishwrap

  6. This morning and this afternoon, on both IE and FF, I tried to share a clipping via Facebook and via email, but non-members can’t see the clipping. When they click on the link, it takes them to a page that never loads. Is this a bug?

  7. Any plans to have more newspapers from Alabama? i. e. Birmingham, Montgomery, Eufaula, Shoals area, Gadsden?
    I live in hope!

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