This Week in History – D-Day

This week marks the anniversary of 1944’s famous D-Day. In the early hours of June 6th, thousands of Allied troops came from sky and sea to invade the beaches of Normandy, France, in hopes of finally regaining control of mainland Europe.

Allies Invade Nazi EuropeAllies Invade Nazi Europe Tue, Jun 6, 1944 – Page 9 · Kingsport News (Kingsport, Tennessee) · Newspapers.com

As with most plans in life and in war, it did not go exactly as hoped; the invasion of Omaha Beach was especially brutal and only narrowly avoided failure, and some supplies never made it to shore. But on the whole the operation was considered a definite success, a pivotal turning point in the war that would lead to the liberation of France from Axis control and pave the way for Allied victory the following year.

France InvadedFrance Invaded Tue, Jun 6, 1944 – Page 1 · The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) · Newspapers.com

Yank ParatroopersYank Paratroopers Wed, Jun 7, 1944 – 18 · Hartford Courant (Hartford, Connecticut) · Newspapers.com

D-Day Puts War in FranceD-Day Puts War in France Tue, Jun 6, 1944 – Page 5 · Star Tribune (Minneapolis, Minnesota) · Newspapers.com

Find more on this important piece of WWII history with a search on Newspapers.com.

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One thought on “This Week in History – D-Day

  1. My uncle Leslie Winsand, a farmer from rural Independence, WI, in Buffalo County, was a glider infantryman with the 82nd Airborne, and he was in action on the night before D-Day. I still recall as a young boy visiting his farm on the night of the 20th anniversary of the invasion when former president and Gen. Eisenhower was interviewed by Walter Cronkite in France on the Normandy landing beaches. I recall looking at Uncle Leslie sitting all tensed up in his chair as he relived what must have been the most frightful and stressful night and days in his young life. He went on to fight across France and into Holland and Belgium, and he survived the Battle of the Bulge. At the end of the war, one of Leslie’s sons told me that his father sat in Hitler’s barber chair for a haircut in the Eagle’s Nest in Austria.

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