Great Chicago Fire of 1871 – This Week in History

On October 8, 1871, a devastating fire spreads across the streets of Chicago. It would come to be known as the Great Chicago Fire.The Fire Fiend - Great Chicago Fire 1871The Fire Fiend – Great Chicago Fire 1871 Sun, Oct 8, 1871 – Page 5 · The New York Times (New York, New York, New York, United States of America) · Newspapers.com

Great Fire in ChicagoGreat Fire in Chicago Mon, Oct 9, 1871 – Page 4 · The Daily State Journal (Alexandria, Alexandria, Virginia) · Newspapers.com

Terrible Fire in Chicago 1871Terrible Fire in Chicago 1871 Sun, Oct 8, 1871 – 1 · Leavenworth Daily Commercial (Leavenworth, Kansas, United States of America) · Newspapers.com

With its frequent high winds and countless wooden structures, 1871 Chicago was prone to fires even before the “Great Fire” tore through the city. However, none were so destructive as this one, which killed hundreds of people and cost millions of dollars (billions, today) in damages.

Find more on this event in history with a search on Newspapers.com.

Share using:

Mount Rushmore Project Begins – This Week in History

This week in 1927, work began on the ambitious sculpture of Mount Rushmore. The project was the brainchild of sculptor Gutzon Borglum.

Mount RushmoreMount Rushmore Sun, Aug 22, 1999 – Page 102 · Daily Press (Newport News, Newport News, Virginia, United States of America) · Newspapers.com

Mountain SculpturingMountain Sculpturing Fri, Oct 7, 1927 – Page 8 · Asbury Park Press (Asbury Park, Monmouth, New Jersey, United States of America) · Newspapers.com

Washington’s face was the first to emerge from the stony cliff. The rest of the sculpture would take 14 years to complete, though “complete” may be the wrong term to use. Gutzon planned for the sculpture to not only include the four famous faces we see there today, but also to inscribe a history of the United States into the mountain that would endure through the ages. However, Gutzon’s unexpected death in 1941 led to an early end to the project, and the history portion of the sculpture was never included.

Not everyone was pleased with the decision to use a natural landscape as the canvas for a memorial to presidents past.

Not everyone pleased about Rushmore memorialNot everyone pleased about Rushmore memorial Wed, Oct 5, 1927 – 4 · Messenger-Inquirer (Owensboro, Kentucky, United States of America) · Newspapers.com

Regardless of the controversies it has stirred in past or present, Mount Rushmore has become an internationally recognizable U.S. landmark.

Mount Rushmore a National ShrineMount Rushmore a National Shrine Thu, Jul 6, 1939 – 6 · Rapid City Journal (Rapid City, Pennington, South Dakota, United States of America) · Newspapers.com

Mount Rushmore, 1941Mount Rushmore, 1941 Thu, Mar 6, 1941 – 6 · Des Moines Tribune (Des Moines, Polk, Iowa, United States of America) · Newspapers.com

Some interesting related articles:

How Rushmore Got its Name

Susan B. Anthony proposed as another addition to Mount Rushmore sculpture

Find more on Mount Rushmore and its history with a search on Newspapers.com.

Share using:

Integration at Central High – This Week in History

On September 25,1957, integration in schools begins in Little Rock, Arkansas, when nine black students are escorted into the halls of previously all-white Central High.

Troops disperse crowd at Central HighTroops disperse crowd at Central High Thu, Sep 26, 1957 – 18 · The Honolulu Advertiser (Honolulu, Hawaii, United States of America) · Newspapers.com

The event was preceded by weeks of difficulty with segregationist governor Orval Faubus. Faubus had ordered National Guard troops to surround the school to prevent the students from entering. His stated reasoning was to “prevent disorder and bloodshed” from citizens who opposed integration. When the Guard was withdrawn at the order of Federal Judge Ronald Davies, the students were escorted through an angry mob by armed guards.

Guard escorts students into Central High SchoolGuard escorts students into Central High School Wed, Sep 25, 1957 – Page 1 · The Kane Republican (Kane, McKean, Pennsylvania) · Newspapers.com

The whole process was pretty rough and wouldn’t get much easier over the next few years. Though some of the white students welcomed their new classmates, many were not so friendly. In 1958 Faubus closed Little Rock’s schools to further prevent integration; this decision was overturned after a tense, year-long fight, and the schools were reopened in 1959.

Find more on this important moment in history with a search on Newspapers.com.

Share using:

Enterprise Unveiled – This Week in History

This week in 1976, NASA’s first space shuttle, the Enterprise, was revealed to the public. And it was definitely named after Star Trek.

The EnterpriseThe Enterprise Fri, Sep 17, 1976 – Page 3 · Abilene Reporter-News (Abilene, Texas) · Newspapers.com

Space Shuttle EnterpriseSpace Shuttle Enterprise Thu, Sep 9, 1976 – Page 9 · Simpson’s Leader-Times (Kittanning, Pennsylvania) · Newspapers.com

Space Shuttle Enterprise Unveiled TodaySpace Shuttle Enterprise Unveiled Today Fri, Sep 17, 1976 – Page 1 · The Index-Journal (Greenwood, South Carolina) · Newspapers.com

Space Shuttle EnterpriseSpace Shuttle Enterprise Sat, Sep 18, 1976 – Page 32 · Asbury Park Press (Asbury Park, New Jersey) · Newspapers.com

The Enterprise was not built to withstand the rigors of space, but was used in atmospheric test flights in the late 1970s. It never went through the intended retrofitting that would allow for spaceflight when it became clear that it would be prohibitively expensive to do so. In 2003 the shuttle was fixed up and put on display at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. It was moved to the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in New York City in 2012 and remains there today.

Find more on this piece of spacey history with a search on Newspapers.com.

Share using:

Attack on America – This Week in History

In the morning hours of September 11th, 2001, the world watched in horror as the twin towers of the World Trade Center were brought down by terrorist attack. This week in headlines:

Sept 11, 2001Sept 11, 2001 Tue, Sep 11, 2001 – Page 47 · The Journal News (White Plains, New York) · Newspapers.com

Sept 11, 2001 attackSept 11, 2001 Tue, Sep 11, 2001 – Page 37 · St. Louis Post-Dispatch (St. Louis, Missouri) · Newspapers.com

Sept 11, 2001Sept 11, 2001 Tue, Sep 11, 2001 – 1 · The Ithaca Journal (Ithaca, New York) · Newspapers.com

Find more on the September 11th attacks on Newspapers.com.

Share using:

Suffrage for Women! – This Week in History

On August 26th, 1920, the 19th Amendment is officially adopted into the constitution. Occasionally called the Anthony Amendment after Susan B. Anthony, one of the first to push for a women’s suffrage amendment, the 19th Amendment granted all women the right to vote.

Suffrage for women19th Amendment adopted Thu, Aug 26, 1920 – Page 4 · Reno Gazette-Journal (Reno, Nevada) · Newspapers.com

This historic moment reflected decades of effort by leaders in the women’s suffrage movement and the organizations they headed. The proclamation was signed without ceremony, but changed millions of lives nonetheless.

Find more headlines and articles from this historic day here, or with a search on Newspapers.com.

Share using:

Miss Farmer’s School of Cookery – This Week in History

On August 23, 1902, Fannie Farmer opens a school to teach her methods of cooking. You may not have heard of her, but she revolutionized American cooking by introducing standardized measuring tools in her famous cookbook. Next time you measure a level teaspoon of baking soda, you know who to thank! Miss Farmer’s aptitude and nearly scientific approach to cooking made her a familiar name across the country.

Made Cooking a ScienceMade Cooking a Science Sun, Nov 24, 1957 – Page 38 · Lansing State Journal (Lansing, Michigan) · Newspapers.com
Miss Fannie FarmerMiss Fannie Farmer Sat, Jul 19, 1902 – 3 · New England Farmer (Boston, Massachusetts) · Newspapers.com

Miss Farmer was unique in her field for another reason, too; not only did her cookery courses focus on fancy dinners and events, but she worked to create diets catered to the ill. She taught nutritional courses to doctors and nurses and considered her work creating meals for those who are so often without appetites to be her most important contribution. But the classes taught in her cooking school focused on all of her areas of expertise.

Miss Farmer's school of cookeryMiss Farmer’s school of cookery Sat, Sep 6, 1902 – 3 · New England Farmer (Boston, Massachusetts) · Newspapers.com

Find more on Fannie Farmer, her cookbook, and her cooking school with a search on Newspapers.com.

Share using:

Berlin Divided – This Week in History

On August 13, 1961, barbed wire fences are put up to divide the Soviet eastern half of the city from democratic West Berlin. This would later become the infamous concrete barrier known as the Berlin Wall.

Barbed wire barrier divides BerlinBarbed wire barrier Mon, Aug 14, 1961 – Page 1 · The Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont) · Newspapers.com

Peace Pact Now Seen IrrevocablePeace Pact Now Seen Irrevocable Mon, Aug 14, 1961 – 3 · Tampa Bay Times (St. Petersburg, Florida) · Newspapers.com

Turned BackTurned Back Mon, Aug 14, 1961 – 8 · Tampa Bay Times (St. Petersburg, Florida) · Newspapers.com

Violate Big Four AccordViolate Big Four Accord Mon, Aug 14, 1961 – 3 · Daily News (New York, New York) · Newspapers.com

Wire put upWire put up Mon, Aug 14, 1961 – 1 · Tampa Bay Times (St. Petersburg, Florida) · Newspapers.com

Find more from this moment in history with a search on Newspapers.com, or by browsing the papers from this time.

Share using:

This Week in History – Voyage of the Kon-Tiki

This week in 1947, a balsa raft called the Kon-Tiki successfully ends its long voyage across the Pacific with a (rough) landing on the uninhabited island of Raroia. The precarious excursion was meant to prove that the Polynesian islands could have originally been settled by South Americans, a theory posited by Norwegian anthropologist and raft captain, Thor Heyerdahl.

Thor HeyerdahlThor Heyerdahl Sun, Jun 1, 1947 – Page 135 · The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) · Newspapers.com

the the “why” behind the trip Thu, May 8, 1947 – Page 25 · The Pittsburgh Press (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) · Newspapers.com

The Kon-Tiki route, and Thor (on the right)The Kon-Tiki route, and Thor (on the right) Sun, Feb 9, 1947 – 57 · The Baltimore Sun (Baltimore, Maryland) · Newspapers.com

The 4,300 mile trip took the six men on board the raft 101 days to complete. The voyage began in late April and was anticipated to last at least four months. The raft itself was constructed as close to the indigenous ancient Peruvian style as could be managed, and would bob along from Peru to Tahiti with the help of the Humboldt Current. As you might expect, an ocean journey on a raft no bigger than a modestly-sized living room had its share of dangers.

the six menthe six men Thu, May 8, 1947 – Page 25 · The Pittsburgh Press (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) · Newspapers.com

sea creature dangerssea creature dangers Sun, Feb 9, 1947 – 57 · The Baltimore Sun (Baltimore, Maryland) · Newspapers.com

The raft crashed into a reef off the coast of Raroia island on August 7—an almost comically bad ending to a long and difficult experiment. Fortunately, all of the crew were fine and made it back home safely afterwards. But on the bright side, they got there ahead of schedule! You win some, you lose some.

Aug 7, 1947Aug 7, 1947 Mon, Aug 11, 1947 – 11 · Hartford Courant (Hartford, Connecticut) · Newspapers.com

Find out more about the Kon-Tiki expedition and the men who braved it with a search on Newspapers.com.

Share using:

This Week in History – USS Nautilus Slides Over North Pole

On August 3rd, 1958, the famous nuclear-powered submarine USS Nautilus makes a historic journey beneath the ice caps of the North Pole. Here are a handful of clippings about the journey and crew from papers across the states during August 1958:

This Time He Made ItThis Time He Made It Sun, Aug 31, 1958 – 16 · Hartford Courant (Hartford, Connecticut) · Newspapers.com

Commander and crew of USS NautilusCommander and crew of USS Nautilus Sun, Aug 31, 1958 – 16 · Hartford Courant (Hartford, Connecticut) · Newspapers.com

Excerpt from letter of Nautilus crewman James IrvinExcerpt from letter of Nautilus crewman James Irvin Tue, Aug 26, 1958 – 4 · The Clinton Eye (Clinton, Missouri) · Newspapers.com

Excerpt from the letter of Nautilus crewman James JohnsonExcerpt from the letter of Nautilus crewman James Johnson Tue, Aug 12, 1958 – Page 2 · The Lincoln Star (Lincoln, Nebraska) · Newspapers.com

Commander Anderson awarded Legion of MeritCommander Anderson awarded Legion of Merit Sat, Aug 9, 1958 – Page 1 · Reno Gazette-Journal (Reno, Nevada) · Newspapers.com

Find more on this unprecedented journey, the many records of the Nautilus, and Commander Anderson with a search on Newspapers.com.

Share using: